Archive for August, 2013

Everybody Dance

I was going to write about disco. The main reason I was going to write about disco was because I love it. I’ve been teaching my disco lesson for about 12 years now, on and off. It’ slightly different every time but I’ve wanted to get across the important points about how the different parts work together. I’ve also been convinced that it’s going to be useful to someone someday because it’s bound to have a bit of a resurgence. And now it seems that may have finally happened. With Daft Punk getting to number 1, the BBC showing ‘The Joy of Disco’ http://youtu.be/4zQpMnU6N4o and Nile Rodgers documentaries http://youtu.be/jGUAiAxpu3E and Chic touring incessantly – not to mention the stellar success of Daft Punk’s Random Access Memories album.

But I decided not to write solely about disco and to make this a fairly general thing about dance music and what are the important factors that make it work. This applies to pretty much all contemporary forms of pop-based dance music from disco to house to reggae to rock bands like AC/DC (for more on them see my previous post on the ‘International Write and Record an Album in a Month, month’ page on Facebook). So here goes…

 

1 The pulse

In dance music, you must have a strong pulse. This is the heartbeat of the song and the thing that will get you nodding your head, snapping your fingers, stamping your feet or shaking your leg. When people talk about the beat, this is what they mean. The tempo of the pulse can help determine your reaction to the music. Let’s say a resting heartbeat is about 80 beats per minute, anything above that may excite you while you are resting. It will try and push your own heart rate up. If you are already dancing, your heart beat will be much faster so you will need to have a song that is going at a faster tempo to keep your adrenalin going. If you’re at a rave and you’ve just taken a load of dodgy jelly beans then you may need the tempo to go up to 130 bpm or over to satisfy your new puppy-like desire for bouncing around. However, if you’ve been smoking banana skins (or whatever it is that people do these days) and you’re lying back on your sofa with your feet up, eating chocolate and the only dance move you can manage is a barely perceptible nodding of the head, then a hip-hop track at 80 or 90 bpm may be enough.

The pulse will usually be provided by the kick drum, though there are variations on this. With house or disco and some reggae tracks, you may get a kick drum on each beat. The low thud, just like a heartbeat, helping you to keep time; relentless and consistent. With other styles, the kick will accent the first and third beats of the bar and the snare backbeat will fill in the gaps. Funk has a heavy accent on the down beat (beat one), whereas one-drop reggae will leave this beat free so that you almost fall into the rest of the bar and the kick drum will accent beat three.

Quite often, the bass part will support the pulse – just listen to ‘Good Times’ by Chic http://youtu.be/rTusMLs9SJE to hear how that infamous bassline by Bernard Edwards supports the pulse on those first three beats before playing the other fancy bits before doing the same thing in bar 3 of this 4 bar riff (John Deacon’s bassline for ‘Another One Bites the Dust’ works in a very similar way http://youtu.be/rY0WxgSXdEE ). Cliff Williams from AC/DC will usually double the pulse by playing 8th notes in his bass parts (take ‘Down Payment Blues’ http://youtu.be/6aLnfglKnis for example).

 

2 The backbeat

The backbeat is what happens on beats 2 and 4 of the bar. These beats are normally emphasised by the snare drum. (On visiting Manchester Music Base, former Yes and King Crimson drummer Bill Bruford described it as ‘the tyranny of the backbeat’.) The snare drum may be supported by handclaps, either real – as in disco – or electronic – as in house or hip hop (check out the handclaps in ‘Turn Me On’ by David Guetta ft Nicki Minaj http://youtu.be/YVw7eJ0vGfM ). Having a strong kick drum on beats one and three and a snare drum on 2 and 4 gives the piece a sense of a marching left-right-left-right rhythm. This is what gets you walking to the dance floor. Got a good strong pulse and backbeat? You’re halfway there. You’ve got the audience stomping and clapping already. All you need now is to fill in the gaps.

 

3 Off-beats

This is where the hi-hats come in. Often, anyway. Listen to Tony Thompson’s playing for Chic (or Sister Sledge or whoever), even if the hi-hat patterns are fairly intricate 16th patterns, he still accents off-beats, or there is the classic groove to ‘Dancing Queen’ by Abba, http://youtu.be/xFrGuyw1V8s  where the shakers do this job. You hear this all the time in house music, with a really strong four to the floor kick, snare and claps on the backbeat and hats on the off-beats.  You’ll notice none of the proper drummers try to do silly demisemiquaver hi-hat patterns. This is because they are not white boy music students trying to show off. The octave bass can often fill this role as well, such as Bernard Edwards’ bass in ‘Dance Dance Dance’, http://youtu.be/wi5NuaNY3lw where you play the low octave on the beat and play the octave above on the off-beat.

In some types of music, other instruments are used to accent the off-beat, such as the guitar in ska. Bands like Mumford and Sons will do a similar thing by providing a strong pulse with a kick drum and making the guitar accent against that. Just listen to the way the guitar in ‘Wake Me Up’ by Avicii does exactly the same. http://youtu.be/IcrbM1l_BoI

 

4 Syncopation

Syncopation is basically stuff that works against the pulse and the accents will land sometimes on the beat and sometimes off the beat. This could be a rhythmic chord part, such as a guitar (often in disco) or a piano (often in house music) or a synth; a percussion part; or even the lead vocal. Let’s take the ‘classic’ (and, by classic, I mean ‘not classic’) ‘She Makes Me Wanna’ by JLS http://youtu.be/YVw7eJ0vGfM . The main chorus vocal has a very distinct pulse of its own that conflicts with the main pulse of the song. Try tapping the pulse of the song with your right hand and the pulse of the vocal line with your left (or the other way round if you’re left-handed). You may find (if you do it properly) that for every 3 taps of your right hand, you will have tapped your left hand (the vocal hand) four times. This could be described as a four-over-three polyrhythm and it is extremely common in contemporary dance music, especially different types of house music.  The left hand and right hand only meet on ‘LONdon to jaMAIca, La to aFRICa…’ and thereby accent the wrong part of Africa, making it sound like a FREAK a. Quite often you will hear these syncopations taken from Latin American rhythmic patterns, such as the Cuban clave patterns or the Bossa Nova. The rhythm guitar part in ‘I’m Coming Out’ by Diana Ross plays the reverse (2:3) Son clave pattern to great effect. 

 

5 Other stuff

It helps if you have a good sing-a-long vocal with a strong hook. If people can sing or shout on the dance floor, they get more excitable and a sense of camaraderie and team spirit ensues. Like football fanaticism but with more rhythm and no opposing team. Lyrics about dancing, music and escape from the humdrum monotony of modern life are often a key element. Check out ‘Lost in Music’ by Sister Sledge http://youtu.be/6Z994IoxrNM .

It also helps to divide those parts up between different instruments. People seem to assume to play a funky bass line or a funky guitar part or drum pattern you have to play loads of notes to have a strong pulse and syncopation but if you have a full band you can keep each instrumental part pretty sparse, then the different instruments don’t sound like they’re racing against each other. Listen to how simple the bass line is on ‘Superstition’, for example. It basically plays the root note on each beat, emphasising the pulse; it doesn’t play the complicated riff that lots of people assume it plays. http://youtu.be/rhw_zbvxvb4 . Or listen to the simplicity of the guitar and drum parts in ‘I Got You (I Feel Good)’ by James Brown http://youtu.be/2gCaJ7foRik .

It’s always worth going back to ‘Good Times’ by Chic. Check out from 3:12 where the track breaks down and you can hear the role each instrument plays: including the accents on the hi-hats; the electric piano playing the sustained chords on the first beat of every bar from 4:04; and the piano that comes in at the end of each bar from 4:40. http://youtu.be/rTusMLs9SJE?t=3m12s

 

Anyway, hope that helps!

 

Advertisements

ImageHi,

I am fatbobmoonbeam. This though is not my real name. I am a musician, teacher and writer, though not necessarily in that order. I am also a number of other things and I can’t really say for certain what I’ll be posting about on this site, although I am fairly certain that I shall be writing about music and teaching music and maybe about writing. Then again, who knows.

I can’t be entirely certain why I am doing this either, I just hope it will be interesting and entertaining to someone at sometime, or even many people at many times.

I suppose a blog is about sharing your thoughts and ideas. I hope I will have some.